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Posts Tagged ‘April 1st’

Census Day, April 1st, is just around the corner. By now you should have received your invitation to participate and we hope that you have already completed your form either online, by phone or by mail. And if you haven’t, you still have time. Visit 2020census.gov for more information.

In light of the COVIS-19 outbreak, the U.S. Bureau has adjusted its operations including delaying the sending of Census takers into communities to follow-up on non-responding households. Beware of any one approaching your home asking about the 2020 Census as that portion of the process won’t begin until the end of May. If you suspect fraud, contact the Decatur Police Department at 404-373-6551 and then call 1-844-330-2020 to speak with a Census Bureau representative.

For more information about the change in the 2020 Census operations schedule or how to avoid fraud and scams, visit 2020census.gov/en/news-evetns/operational-adjustments-covid19 or 2020census.gov/en/avoiding-fraud.

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By now you should have received your 2020 Census notification information in the mail and it may have made you wonder why certain questions were asked. Here is a breakdown on several of the questions as taken from the 2020census.gov website:

  1. What is your telephone number?

Why we ask this question: The Census Bureau asks for your phone number in case there are any questions about your census form. We will only contact you for official census business, if needed.

  1. What is Person 1’s name?

If there is someone living here who pays the rent or owns the residence, start by listing him or her as Person 1. If the owner or the person who pays the rent does not live here, start by listing any adult living there as Person 1. There will be opportunities to list the names of additional members of your household. See more about answering this question ….

Why we ask this question: The Census Bureau asks a series of questions about each member of your household. This allows us to establish one central figure as a starting point.

  1. What is Person 1’s sex?

Mark ONE box: male or female.

Why we ask this question: This allows us to create statistics about males and females, which can be used in planning and funding government programs. This data can also be used to enforce laws, regulations, and policies against discrimination.

  1. What is Person 1’s age and what is Person 1’s date of birth?

Note Person 1’s age as of April 1, 2020. For babies less than 1 year old, do not write the age in months. Write 0 as the age.

Why we ask this question: The U.S. Census Bureau creates statistics to better understand the size and characteristics of different age groups. Agencies use this data to plan and fund government programs that support specific age groups, including children and older adults. (Read more about Counting Young Children.)

  1. Is Person 1 of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin?

NOTE: Please answer both Question 8 about Hispanic origin and Question 9 about race.  For this census, Hispanic origins are not races. Hispanic origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before arriving in the United States. People who identify as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be any race.

Why we ask this question: These responses help create statistics about this ethnic group. This helps federal agencies monitor compliance with anti-discrimination provisions, such as those in the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act.

  1. What is Person 1’s race? 

Mark one or more boxes AND print origins: White; Black or African American; American Indian or Alaska Native; Chinese; Filipino; Asian Indian; Vietnamese; Korean; Japanese; other Asian; Native Hawaiian; Samoan; Chamorro; other Pacific Islander; some other race. See more about answering this question ….

Why we ask this question: This allows us to create statistics about race and to analyze other statistics within racial groups. This data helps federal agencies monitor compliance with anti-discrimination provisions, such as those in the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act.

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The breakdown for Questions 1 through 4 were posted on The Decatur Minute last week and the remaining questions will be posted next week.

And as a reminder, here are the things that the Census Bureau will never ask you:

  • Your Social Security number.
  • Money or donations.
  • Anything on behalf of a political party.
  • Your bank or credit card account numbers.

Additionally, there is no citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

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Ever wondered why the Census questionnaire asks a certain question? If so, wonder no more. Here is a breakdown on the first few questions as taken from the 2020census.gov website:

  1. How many people were living or staying in this house, apartment, or mobile home on April 1, 2020?

Here, you’ll count everyone living and sleeping in your home most of the time, including young children, roommates, and friends and family members who are living with you, even temporarily.

Why we ask this question: This helps us count the entire U.S. population and ensures that we count people where they live most of the time as of Census Day (April 1, 2020).

  1. Were there any additional people staying here on April 1, 2020, that you did not include in Question 1?

Mark all that apply: Children, related or unrelated, such as newborn babies, grandchildren, or foster children; relatives, such as adult children, cousins, or in-laws; nonrelatives, such as roommates or live-in babysitters, and people staying here temporarily.

Why we ask this question: The goal of the 2020 Census is to count everyone just once and in the right place. We want to ensure that everyone in your home who should be counted is counted—including newborns, roommates, and those who may be staying with you temporarily.

  1. Is this house, apartment, or mobile home (mark ONE box) …

…Owned by you or someone in this household with a mortgage or loan? Include home equity loans. Is it owned by you or someone in this household free and clear (without a mortgage or loan)? Rented? Occupied without payment of rent?

Why we ask this question: This helps us produce statistics about homeownership and renting. The rates of homeownership serve as one indicator of the nation’s economy. They also help with administering housing programs, planning, and decision-making.

  1. What is your telephone number?

Why we ask this question: The Census Bureau asks for your phone number in case there are any questions about your census form. We will only contact you for official census business, if needed.

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The breakdown for Questions 5 through 12 will be posted on The Decatur Minute in the coming weeks. If you want to know before then, check out https://2020census.gov/en/about-questions.html. You may also review a sample questionnaire here if you would like to see it in full —

English https://2020census.gov/content/dam/2020census/materials/partners/2019-08/2020-informational-questionnaire.pdf

Spanish https://2020census.gov/content/dam/2020census/materials/partners/2019-08/2020-informational-questionnaire-spanish.pdf

And here are the things that the Census Bureau will never ask you:

  • Your Social Security number.
  • Money or donations.
  • Anything on behalf of a political party.
  • Your bank or credit card account numbers.

Additionally, there is no citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

 

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By now you have probably heard that 2020 is the year for the US Census and that this census will be the first to utilize an online response option. Responding by phone and mail are also still options.

To assist you in getting ready to complete the information for your household, check out this list of important dates –

On or between: You’ll receive:
March 12-20, 2020 An invitation to respond online to the 2020 Census. Some households will also receive paper questionnaires.
March 16-24, 2020 A reminder letter.

 

If you haven’t responded yet:  
March 26-April 3, 2020 A reminder postcard.
April 8-16, 2020 A reminder letter and paper questionnaire.
April 20-27, 2020 A final postcard reminder before a US Census Bureau worker follows up in person.
May-July, 2020 US Census Bureau workers visit household that did not fill out the questionnaire on paper, online or over the phone. The census workers collect information at the door of each house they visit. This process is called non-response follow-up.

 

Want to know more? Visit 2020census.gov, census.georgia.gov or visit the City’s Census webpage at www.decaturga.com

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April 1, 2020 is Census Day. The City of Decatur wants all of its residents to participate to help inform the process for the distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds to communities around the country each year for things such as health care, emergency services, infrastructure, education and food assistance.

Want more information about the impacts of the Census or do you have questions about the items on the survey instrument or even about the confidentiality of the data? Then check out 2020census.gov, census.georgia.gov or visit the City’s Census webpage at www.decaturga.com because Every.One.Counts.

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